02
Dec
One sure way to determine the social conscience of a government is to examine the way taxes are collected and how they are spent. And one sure way to determine the social conscience of an individual is to get his tax reaction. Taxes, after all are the dues we pay for the privilege of membership in an organized society.
- President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, actively making the case for taxes as part of his re-election campaign in 1936. A far cry from our current politics when it comes to taxation. (via upwithchris)
18
Apr
We have what I would describe as the world’s worst tax code. It is the longest, the most complicated, riddled with loopholes, exceptions and deductions - all of which are fundamentally institutionalized corruption. They are a way that Congress is able to reward powerful constituents by giving them what seem to be small giveaways in the tax code but which are, of course, government grants often amounting to hundreds and millions and billions of dollars in perpetuity…
17
Apr
29
Mar
As the two parties sketch out their general-election campaign platforms, both should commit to a reasonable and responsible goal—closing the deficit in 10 years. Even given Washington’s current dysfunction, this can be achieved through a simple two-step process: The president can declare that he will allow the Bush tax cuts to expire for all income levels, and Congress can take an up-or-down vote on the Simpson-Bowles deficit-reduction plan, as a bipartisan group of House centrists will propose this week. That plan calls for $4 trillion in savings by capping discretionary spending, slowing the growth of entitlement costs including Social Security, and raising revenue through tax reform.
05
Feb

Michael Bloomberg: Let Bush tax cuts expire

"We should all pony up," Bloomberg said, noting that he favors enacting the Simpson-Bowles fiscal plan.

"If you only raise taxes on the rich, you don’t get that much money," Bloomberg said. Further, he said that the attitude needs to change into "we’re all in this together" because everybody gets some benefit from government.

03
Nov

Study: 30 top firms paid no federal income taxes

Poor people don’t pay income tax and conservatives freak out. Fortune 500 companies don’t pay income tax and conservatives applaud.

01
Nov

Majority of Americans Support Taxing the Rich and Redistributing Wealth

69% of Americans think Republican policies favor the rich

66% of Americans think the nation’s wealth should be more evenly distributed

65% of Americans think million-dollar households should receive a tax increase

Source

27
Oct

43% of Americans Agree with Occupy Wall Street, 30% Aren't Sure, Only 27% Disagree

25
Oct
21
Oct

CHART OF THE DAY: The ‘47 Percent’ Pay Their Fair Share

I suppose it depends on how you define “fair share,” but almost everyone in this country pays taxes and contributes to federal revenue. The idea that there’s a “53%” that pays for everyone else is pure fiction. 

19
Oct

Tax Policy Center: Cain’s 9-9-9 Plan Would Cut Taxes for the Rich, Raise Taxes for Almost Everyone Else

18
Oct

Quiz: Are You Smarter Than a Wall Street Occupier?

Don’t mean to brag, but I got all of these right. I support “Occupy Wall Street” as well.

12
Oct

Iran, Uganda, and Russia have better income distribution than America

The CIA’s World Factbook: COUNTRY COMPARISON :: DISTRIBUTION OF FAMILY INCOME - GINI INDEX

I am flipping the fuck out over these numbers. Meanwhile, of course, all of the supposedly “socialist” countries have terrific income distribution because they are strong welfare states with progressive tax rates.

3 words: Occupy Wall Street 

05
Oct

Why I Support Occupying Wall Street

I’ve heard it argued, by The Economist and others, that the Wall Street protests are not worth supporting because the protestors are hypocrtical, impractical non-voters who aim to bring down a system they’ve never participated in. This argument essentially amounts to a “do nothing,” maintain the status quo mentality.

If the protestors are non-voters, then participating in protests could cause them to think more pragmatically and start participating in elections. If the protestors are impractical cynics, then surely participating in organized protests is a step towards political engagement. Either way, I find it impossible to buy the argument that the protests are useless. The worst case scenario is that enthusiasm wanes and the protests fizzle out. The best case scenario is that politicians feel emboldened to act on behalf of the 99% and the protestors think more positively about American democracy.

Those who believe the protestors should just vote more often, regardless of whether or not the candidates are worth voting for, are ultimately supporting more of the same. And this, for people without jobs, insurance, or hope, is simply not acceptable.