12
Sep

If history is any guide, the sentiments behind Occupy will find their way into the political process, just as the anti-Vietnam movement helped create Eugene McCarthy’s presidential bid in 1968, and the civil-rights movement bred politicians like Andrew Young, Tom Bradley, and Jesse Jackson. That’s especially likely because Occupy’s message enjoys significant support among the young. A November 2011 Public Policy Polling survey found that while Americans over 30 opposed Occupy’s goals by close to 20 points, Millennials supported them by 12.

Bill de Blasio’s mayoral campaign offers a glimpse into what an Occupy-inspired challenge to Clintonism might look like.

[…]

Democrats in New York are more liberal than Democrats nationally. Still, the right presidential candidate, following de Blasio’s model, could seriously challenge Hillary Clinton.

- Peter Beinart, in his fascinating piece The Rise of the New Left
19
Sep

Bill Clinton is no liberal hero

Clinton has in fact done phenomenally well from the financial services industry in his post-presidential career. He received $125,000 in cash apiece from Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse just two months after signing the bill deregulating derivatives. 

He garnered cash before energy groups, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry, and offered political advice about healthcare and the Keystone pipeline. He has strange investments in a Dubai-based fund. Last year alone, which is the latest year for which we have disclosure information, Clinton received six-figure cash payments from Goldman Sachs ($200,000), HSBC Securities  ($200,000), Fidelity Investments ($175,000), TD Bank ($260,000), Itau BBA USA Securities ($175,000), privatization specialist Highstar Capital ($175,000), Jefferies and Co. ($200,000), UBS Wealth Management ($165,000 and $150,000), American Express ($250,000), TD Ameritrade ($200,000), Highland Capital ($175,000), Wells Fargo ($200,000), the Association for Financial Professionals ($175,000) and Bank of America Merrill Lynch ($200,000).

17
Sep
17
Aug

Pussy Riot supporters arrested in NYC

17
Aug

Protests Scheduled in Support of Pussy Riot in NYC Today

11
Aug
The Justice Department prosecutes Roger Clemens for perjury—spends countless resources, hours, and energy worrying about steroids in baseball—yet seems incapable of making cases against the big Wall Street firms that engineered the greatest lies, frauds, and scams in our economic history. I am as outraged, disappointed, and furious as you are. Have they no backbone, shame, or sense of what justice is all about? It does nothing for my already waning faith in this Justice Department.
22
May

New statistics show an ever-more-startling divergence between the fortunes of the wealthy and everybody else — and the desperate need to address this wrenching problem. Even in a country that sometimes seems inured to income inequality, these takeaways are truly stunning.

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.

The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation.

- The Rich Get Even RicherNew York Times
23
Apr

The Case Against Lehman Brothers

An excellent 60 Minutes piece on Lehman’s outrageous and unpunished illegal behavior. 

18
Apr
I would probably reorganize the [Occupy] movement around a single, achievable goal: a financial boycott of the six “ too big to fail ” Wall Street firms: Bank of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo. We would encourage people who had deposits in these firms to withdraw them, and put them in smaller, not “too big to fail” banks. We would stigmatize anyone who invested, in any way, in any of these banks. I’d try to organize college students to protest on campuses. Their first goal would be to force the university endowments to divest themselves of shares in these banks.
25
Mar
To me, the Occupy movement was all about protesting the companies that, for decades, manipulated our political and financial systems for their own gain and, as a result, brought down the world economy. It is not about standing around in parks, it is not about sleeping in tents, and it is not about getting arrested. 
The donut incident is only a singular event, but it highlights the Occupy movement’s major problem: it doesn’t seem to have anything interesting left to say or do. Clearly, there is a limit to what protesting in parks can accomplish. I think that limit has been reached.

To me, the Occupy movement was all about protesting the companies that, for decades, manipulated our political and financial systems for their own gain and, as a result, brought down the world economy. It is not about standing around in parks, it is not about sleeping in tents, and it is not about getting arrested. 

The donut incident is only a singular event, but it highlights the Occupy movement’s major problem: it doesn’t seem to have anything interesting left to say or do. Clearly, there is a limit to what protesting in parks can accomplish. I think that limit has been reached.

25
Mar

Fishing for cops with doughnuts - Occupy protest in Union Square

It’s becoming increasingly embarrassing to have ever been associated with these protests. They are no longer intended to stir the national conversation. They are merely publicity stunts, and poorly conceived publicity stunts at that. If someone must be pepper sprayed, please let it be the fool who thought up this “fishing” idea. 

21
Mar

Trayvon Martin protest in Union Square

Photos by Prettay Prettay Good

13
Mar
I think that everybody wants to be part of that 1 percent, if you call it that. Everybody wants a chance to dream, to grow, and prosper.
-

Matt Romney, Mitt Romney’s son

Sadly, only 1 percent of people can be the wealthiest 1 percent, hence the “1 percent” part. More Republican nonsense about everyone being rich. It’s never going to happen.

12
Mar

Occupy Wall Street Protesters Suing New York City for Unwarranted Arrests

On Nov. 17, Kira Moyer-Sims was near the Manhattan Bridge, buying coffee while three friends waited nearby in a car. More than a dozen blocks away, protesters gathered for an Occupy Wall Street “day of action,” which organizers had described as an attempt to block the streets around the New York Stock Exchange.

Then, Ms. Moyer-Sims said, about 30 police officers surrounded her and the people in the car.

All four were arrested, said Vik Pawar, a lawyer for Ms. Moyer-Sims and two of the others, and taken to a police facility in the East Village. He said officers strip-searched them and ignored their requests for a lawyer. The fourth person could not be reached for comment.

Ms. Moyer-Sims, 20, said members of the Police Department’s intelligence division asked about her personal history, her relationship with other protesters, the nature of Occupy Wall Street and plans for upcoming protests.

“I felt like I had been arrested for a thought crime,” she said.

Mr. Pawar said that the police had charged his three clients, Ms. Moyer-Sims, Angela Richino and Matthew Vrvilo, with obstructing governmental administration, but that the Manhattan district attorney’s office had declined to prosecute them.

Now they are preparing to sue the city, Mr. Pawar said, adding that the arrests had violated their constitutional rights.

“Not only are the police disrupting people’s rights to free expression,” Mr. Pawar said. “They are taking pre-emptive steps by arresting people who might be just thinking about exercising their rights.”

02
Mar

Jeffrey Sachs Must Be the Next World Bank President

Sachs is an economist and bestselling author from Columbia University who has spent decades assisting the economies of poor and developing countries. Long an advocate of increased development aid, Sachs is also a passionate defender of the Occupy movement (his most recent book, The Price of Civilization, is a must read).

I had the pleasure of briefly meeting him at a protest in New York last October (I also shot a little interview of him discussing money in politics). For what it’s worth, I wholeheartedly support Sachs becoming the next World Bank president. Below is an excerpt from his Washington Post op-ed, published yesterday:

Unlike previous World Bank presidents, I don’t come from Wall Street or U.S. politics. I am a practitioner of economic development, a scholar and a writer. My track record is to side with the poor and hungry, not with a corporate balance sheet or a government.

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